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Hooker with a Camera


“I have been a photographer my entire adult life. In the name of bearing witness to the human condition I’ve documented unspeakable suffering, violence, and death; and for that I’ve been praised as a courageous witness. When I review the scope of people, places and events that have passed before my lens, I am unable to comprehend the censor’s rationale for “protecting” adults from photographic images of sexuality. Adults have the capacity and the right to choose for themselves what sort of images they wish to see. They do not need to be protected from images of sex, and least of all from a film like DAMON AND HUNTER. In the face of horrific images we are exposed to each and every day, the OFLC decision is not only unfair, it is perverse.” –Tony Comstock, An Open Letter to the OFLC, September 8, 2006

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2 Comments

  1. agoodbadhabit
    Posted June 3, 2008 at 4:02 pm | Permalink

    Hey there TC!

    This is a stunning example of why Khym and I were so eager to do a film! Violence and destruction are accepted, but human sexual relations are anathema.

    I can’t tell you how grateful we are that we met you, and were able to help make something that celebrates humanity!

    cheers,
    Matt

    ps- I have never seen any piece of adult entertainment that I wished I could “un-see.” I sure can’t say the same for the “acceptable” films, which were featured in the link.

  2. tony
    Posted June 3, 2008 at 4:30 pm | Permalink

    There are some awfully good films featuring/exploring/exploiting graphic violence. I hold them in no ill will. (Much of my inspiration/confidence I had to film the two of you the way we did came from SAVIING PRIVATE RYAN) But I am quite jealous of filmmakers who are fascinated by violence. They are never obligated to make any claims to the “artist merit” of their films. They just make the films they want to make.

    I am quite sure that if artists had the same degree of latitude to explore sexuality that they have to explore violence, Hollywood would have figured out a way to explore sexuality in the same rich detail that it has explored violence without exposing actors to the same degree of risk that are part and parcel of producing sexually graphic films today. We’d probably get some damn good movies too!

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